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Keeping Your Trade Show Display And Banner Stands Simple But Effective

Creating an effective exhibit for a trade show can be a daunting task. It’s tempting to throw as much information about your company as you can onto banner stands, portable displays and other elements and hope that at least a few conference attendees will retain the information. Unfortunately, most people on the trade show floor are already suffering from sensory overload by the time they reach your booth and if there’s too much information for them to process in the few seconds they glance your way, you’ve lost them.

When Less Is More

Overly detailed or elaborate graphics can confuse the eye, leaving people wondering what it is they’re supposed to be focusing on. In a very real sense, less is more. Banner stands shouldn’t tell the whole story — they are the “bait” that will successfully lure visitors into your tradeshow display. Once you’ve “hooked” visitors, you can reel them in and give them more information when they’re actually talking to you face to face or perusing the brochures or flyers you’ll have placed strategically in your area. Ideally, when attendees first see your banner stands or other tradeshow display elements, it should leave them wanting more.

Effective Banner Stands

There’s a popular mnemonic device that can help you with your banner stands or any other elements that are designed to capture the attention of passersby: KISS for Keep It Simple, Stupid. A large headline with minimal words can be seen at a greater distance, drawing the eyes of visitors and eclipsing your competitor’s tradeshow display. Graphics should be kept crisp and clean. This isn’t the place for unusual photo effects that blur images or create an altered perception; these will only confuse people and perhaps frustrate them.

When designing your exhibit for a trade show, you should keep it simple and make a clear, precise statement, but you don’t have to give away all your secrets. Remember, you’re trying to lure people to your tradeshow display to learn more, not shroud things in so much mystery that they give up and move on. A banner that says, “We Sell More Homes” is direct, to the point, and encourages people to wonder, “How do they do it?” Another example might be “Acme Widgets — Changing Your World.” Wouldn’t you like to know how Acme is changing the world? And what part of it they’re changing?

Contact Information And More Contact Information

While you may want to limit the information on your banner stands to a short, catchy phrase and your company name, don’t neglect contact information. If your headline is short and sweet, you could run your email address under it in a slightly smaller font (but still readable from a distance). If there are attendees who simply can’t take the time to visit each tradeshow display, they may log in that evening from their laptop to learn more if they have a web address.

Make sure your flyers, brochures and table top displays all carry at least two different kinds of contact information. Your website address, blog address, phone number, an email address and an actual location (if it’s relevant) are all great ways for potential clients to reach you after you’ve taken down your tradeshow display and headed back to the office. Take advantage of smart phones and social media as well; the more opportunities you offer for people to contact you, the easier you’re making their lives. And making their lives easier is the first step toward helping them realize just how indispensable your company is!

When designing your Houston tradeshow display, Skyline Displays of Houston is ready with banner stands in Houston (http://www.skylinehouston.com/portable-displays/display-systems/banner-stands/) that sizzle to compliment your custom Houston exhibit for a trade show. For great design ideas, visit http://www.skylinehouston.com.

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